Metropolis Magazine
Issue #805 - Friday, Aug 28th, 2009
Metropolis Specials Metropolis Classifieds Metropolis Joblet Visitor's Guide Japan Inc Kansai Scene iTunes Metropolis Friends Metpod
SEARCH METROPOLIS
PRESS RELEASE
English
Japanese
INSIDE METROPOLIS
Home
Podcast
Giveaway!
Photo of the Week
The Small Print
UPFRONT
Star Struck
Q&A
"Page 2 "
FEATURE ARTICLES
Advertorial
Feature
The Goods
Body & Soul
Tech Know
Cars & Bikes
Global Village
Horoscope
Mailbox
The Last Word
The Negi
+ Best of Tokyo
Classifieds
Jobfinder
TRAVEL
Features
Haikyo Corner
Out & About
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
Agenda
Art
Books
CDs
Clubbing
Dance
Japan Beat
Music
Sports
Stage
Live Report
Multimedia
Pop Life
2008 Flashback
LISTINGS
Concerts
Jazz/World
Classical
Stage & Dance
Clubbing
Exhibitions
Sports
TV
Others
Fireworks
Metropolis League
MOVIES
Reviews
Times
Theater Maps
DINING OUT
Restaurant Review
Bar Review
International Dining
Local Flavors
Table Talk
Tastemaker
Sake
Wine
Beer
INFO
About Us
Subscribe
Distribution Points
Search
Sponsored Links
Tsukaeru
チラシ印刷
Past Issues

fascination with…
…White Day

The Japanese Valentine’s tradition is for women to give chocolate (giri or otherwise) to all the men in their lives, but the ladies get theirs back on White Day a month later. Traditionally, the men are expected to follow a strict sanbai-gaeshi rule (i.e. give each girl a present worth three times what you received), though the younger generation has become less picky. In the name of equality—and increased sales—the latest trend is gyaku choco (literally “reverse chocolate”), where guys do the giving on Valentine’s, American-style. Sweets-maker Morinaga cashed in on the fashion by selling “gyaku” versions of its Dars chocolate in mirror-image packaging. Which begs the question, do gyaku choco-getting girls have to reciprocate, too? And a whole new cash cow is born…


urban wildlife

Forget the voracious predators of old: the modern Japanese man is an altogether softer, more refined creature. Writer Maki Fukasawa coined the term herbivorous male (草食系男子, soushokukei danshi) in 2006 to describe this new breed, and the phrase has since become common parlance. But how do you know one when you see one? Look for these telltale signs:

- Slim, dresses well

- Prefers staying at home to going out

- Has female friends, but not interested in dating

- Devotes more time to fashion or hobbies than relationships

- Steers clear of after-work drinking sessions

- Easily contented, not much of a go-getter

- Very close with family, especially mother



scene around town

What: Torayan, a 7.2m-tall fire-breathing robot
Where: Roppongi Hills Arena
When: Demonstration at 6pm on Saturday, March 28 & Sunday, March 29, as part of Roppongi Art Night festivities
Who: Created by artist Kenji Yanobe
Why: “This giant Torayan doll is the ultimate child’s weapon, as it sings, dances, breathes fire, and follows only those orders given by children”


statshot

good cause

The Tap Project, which began in New York City in 2007 as an effort to bring awareness to World Water Week (March 22-28), has arrived in Japan as Tap Tokyo. The concept: by paying just ¥100 for the water that you usually get for free at restaurants, you can help provide safe drinking water for children around the world. The money collected will go directly to UNICEF’s efforts to make clean water accessible to those in need—for ¥100, a child in a developing country can drink clean water for 40 days. Over 200 restaurants and cafes in central Tokyo will participate, with a goal of raising at least ¥10,000,000. Donations are also accepted by credit card online and at your local conbini. See www.unicef.or.jp/tapproject/en/ for brief information in English.



malaise
Ministerial Resignations*

Genichiro Sata, Minister for Administrative Reform
Resigned: Dec 27, 2006
Reason: Alleged misuse of funds

Toshikatsu Matsuoka, Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Committed suicide: May 28, 2007
Reason: Alleged misuse of funds

Fumio Kyuma, Minister of Defense
Resigned: Jul 3, 2007
Reason: Said the atomic bombing of Japan “couldn’t be helped”

Norihiko Akagi, Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Resigned: Aug 1, 2007
Reason: Office accounting scandal

Takehiko Endo, Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Resigned:
Sep 3, 2007
Reason: Misuse of subsidies

Shinzo Abe, Prime Minister
Resigned:
Sep 12, 2007
Reason: Health problems, unpopularity

Yasuo Fukuda, Prime Minister
Resigned:
Sep 1, 2008
Reason: Political deadlock, unpopularity

Seiichi Ota, Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Resigned:
Sep 19, 2008
Reason: Tainted rice scandal

Nariaki Nakayama, Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism
Resigned:
Sep 28, 2008
Reason: Repeated verbal gaffes

Shoichi Nakagawa, Minister of Finance and Minister of State for Financial Services
Resigned:
Feb 17, 2009
Reason: Apparently drunk at G7 press conference

*since the last general election in September 2005

Got something to say about this article? Send a letter to the editor at letters@metropolis.co.jp.

Listen to the Metropolis Podcast, the coolest guide to what goes on this week in Tokyo.

Looking for international friends? Check Metropolis Friends now - it's 100% free!