Metropolis Magazine
Issue #805 - Friday, Aug 28th, 2009
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tarento watch

Photo Courtesy of SKY PERFECT TV

Former Morning Musume singer Nozomi Tsuji, 22, was the guest of honor at a promotional event for the 2008 Emmy-winning American TV series Pushing Daisies. The show, which ran for two seasons, revolves around a pie-maker named Ned (played by Lee Pace) who was born with the ability to revive the dead just by touching them. However, if he touches them a second time, they die again—and stay dead. A crazy turn of events finds Ned resuscitating his first love (Anna Friel) with his powers, only to be faced with the dilemma of not being able to lay a single finger on her again. “I can’t wait to watch the next episode,” Tsuji gushed after viewing the pilot. “I can’t imagine not being able to touch the person I love, because I’m very affectionate.” In honor of Ned’s profession, Tsuji was presented with a pie made in the shape of a ribbon and filled with sweet potatoes. Reminiscing on her own love life, she said: “I was the one who madly approached my husband. I got rejected three times before he finally asked me out. It’s hard having a crush on someone because you can’t snuggle up to them, no matter how much you want to.”

Pushing Daisies airs Sundays at 9pm on AXN. Satomi Honda


Comedy duo Non Style picked up a cool ¥10 million when they were voted the winners of Softbank’s “S-1 Battle” contest by nearly 800,000 Softbank users. The manzai team won for their video of Akira Ishida, 29, and his reaction after being splashed with hot and cold water—with a little Tabasco thrown in for good measure… The government’s new anti-drug poster, which features actress Yukie Nakama, 29, in her Gokusen getup, says “NO! DRUG” in English… Actress Masami Nagasawa, 22, actor Mokomichi Hayami, 24, comedian Koji Higashino, 41, and actress-comedian Shizuyo Yamasaki, 30, were named winners of the 10th Best Swimmer Awards, presented by the Japan Swimming Club Association to celebrities who look good in swimsuits. CB


survey
Girls, what was on your mind during your first kiss?

Is this how I do it?
I wonder if my breath smells…
What happens after this?
How long do I have to do this?
How do I breathe?
 
Source: Goo Ranking (http://ranking.goo.ne.jp)

 










trivia

- A century ago, some Japanese thought that baseball playing would hurt the country’s morals, as true sportsmen don’t steal (bases)

- During an 1881 tour of Japan, the Prince of Wales (later King George V) had a large Japanese-style dragon tattooed on his arm

- Lake Tazawa in Akita Prefecture is the deepest lake in the nation, at 423m; the shallowest is Lake Jusan, across the prefectural border in Aomori, with a maximum depth of just 1.5m

- The Yurikamome monorail that shuttles folk between Shimbashi and Odaiba is named after the black-headed gull, which has been the official bird of Tokyo since 1965

- During the 2002 South Korea/Japan World Cup, no games were held in Tokyo Mark Buckton

tea time

The third annual Welcome to Omotesando Hills event highlights Kyoto culture—with a twist. Organizers have collaborated with eccentric art-themed teahouse Beni Komori, whose baristas will be on hand to prepare Kyoto-style coffee drinks (whatever those might be). Traditionally clad maiko will provide a demonstration of ryurei tea ceremony, a Meiji-era innovation that brought a modern sensibility to sado. There will also be a market selling Kyoto delicacies. Omotesando Hills, July 24-27.

www.omotesandohills.com



wishes

If you passed through Shibuya last week, you would have noticed a large decorated tree looming over Hachiko. No, this wasn’t another case of the Japanese starting their Christmas celebrations way too early. It was actually a Tanabata tree, festooned with colorful strips of paper that people recorded their wishes on—a tradition similar to the ema found at temples. Here are some of the hopes.

I want to be popular! I want to date Aoki-san Let there be world peace!! I hope I pass the national exam
Please let me find a job I want to lose 5kg I hope our team makes it to the championships I hope I get a big bonus this year
I hope I get back together with my girlfriend I want a bigger desk at work! Please don’t let my grades go down  



turning the page

There were unconfirmed reports of 30-something hipsters weeping in their macrobiotic lunches after news emerged that Studio Voice would be going “on hiatus” (and we all know what that means) from August. First started in 1977, the magazine was a lightning rod for Japanese subculture during the ’80s and ’90s, celebrating leftfield music, film, art, design and whatever else was currently being ignored by the mainstream media. With its thick matte paper and collage-heavy layouts, Studio Voice set new standards for magazine design that remained compelling even after the editorial had begun to lose its edge. The bookstore racks will feel a lot poorer without it.

www.studiovoice.jp

scene around town

What: “Legal Wall” public art project

Where: Park Building, 10-1 Udagawacho, Shibuya-ku

Who: International graffiti group Komposition

Why: Dedicated to promoting up-and-coming street artists and alternative art forms, the NPO aims to turn the entire city into a gallery

http://komposition.org
Marie Wanibe

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